10 Things You Need To Know Before The Opening Bell

Hong Kong protestor policeREUTERS/Tyrone SiuPolice are cracking down on Hong Kong’s protest encampments.

Good morning! These are the major stories from around the world getting traction this morning.

European Markets Are Rallying. After a dismal week, stocks across Europe are bouncing back, with every major index up between one and two per cent today.

The iPhone 6 Finally Hit China. Apple began selling its latest iPhone in China Friday, nearly a month after other major territories due to a licence delay by regulators.

Virgin Bought Out Tiger Airways For 88 Cents. Virgin on Friday took full control of budget carrier Tigerair Australia, buying the remaining 40 per cent it did not already own for one Australian dollar (88 US cents).

Yellen Is Speaking Later. The Fed chair will speak at 8.30 a.m. ET, and September housing starts will be announced at the same time. Economists expect over a million new units.

Russia Burned $US13 Billion Trying To Prop Up The Ruble. The Russian central bank has been burning through the country’s foreign exchange reserves as investors sell the ruble, driving its value ever lower.

Police Are Cracking Down On Hong Kong’s Protestors. Hong Kong police cleared a pro-democracy protest site in the city’s densely populated Mong Kok area early Friday.

The World Health Organisation Says The Ebola ‘Situation Is Deteriorating’. While the US is panicking about three Ebola cases in one month, parts of West Africa are deteriorating rapidly, with little sign that the region is getting the outbreak under control.

Japan’s First Commercial Jet In 50 Years Is About To Be Released. Mitsubishi Aircraft will roll out a new commercial jet on Saturday.

Amazon Is Bringing Its Same-Day Delivery Service To New York. Amazon is expanding its online grocery delivery program to Brooklyn’s well-heeled Park Slope neighbourhood on Friday.

The Bank Of England Is Signaling A Later Rate Hike. Chief Economist Andy Haldane said in a speech that he was “gloomier” about the economy than he was three months ago, and a rate hike might take more time.

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