10 things you need to know before the opening bell

Helicopter carReuters/China Daily China Daily Information Corp – CDICYuan Jingying, drives his home-made vehicle in the shape of helicopter along a road in Zhengzhou, Henan province.

Here is what you need to know.

Legal costs weighed on Deutsche Bank. The bank announced as net profit of 559 million euros. Legal expenses amounted to 1.5 billion euros ($US2.5 billion), with Reuters reporting it “raised contingent liabilities – or legal costs that it deems possible but unlikely – by half to 3.2 billion euros.”

HSBC is considering spinning off its UK retail banking unit. Such a move would make for a $US30.37 billion dollar deal. Reuters reports, “A UK law forcing banks to separate their domestic retail operations by 2019 is likely to be a key factor in any decision.”

Corinthian Colleges is closing all of its schools. The school is closing its 28 for-profit schools, meaning approximately 16,000 students will have to finish their degrees elsewhere. According to NBC, the Department of Education will “help the stranded students review their options, including possibly forgiving some of their loans.”

Cap Gemini will buy IGATE for $US4 billion. Cap Gemini will pay $US48 per share for IGATE, a 4.7% premium to Friday’s closing price. According to Reuters, “The acquisition will strengthen its businesses in application and infrastructure services as well as business process outsourcing and engineering services, also adding new flagship clients such as General Electric and Royal Bank of Canada.”

The Applied Materials and Tokyo Electron merger has been called off. The $US29 billion deal announced in September of 2013 has been scrapped due to problems with the US Justice Department. “There remains a gap between the view of Tokyo Electron and Applied Materials and the view of the United States Department of Justice, and it has become apparent that such gap will not be able to be bridged,” Tokyo Electron said in a statement.

Japanese debt was downgraded at Fitch. Japan’s credit rating was lowered one-notch to ‘A’ at Fitch. The agency cited “the high and rising level of government debt” as reason for the downgrade after previously warning on the issue. Japan’s yen is down 0.3% at 119.35 per dollar.

A computer glitch at Starbucks has been resolved. On Friday, cash registers were down at locations in the US and Canada. The glitch caused some stores to give away drinks for free.

Global stock markets trade mixed. China’s Shanghai Composite (+3%) surged to a seven-year high to pace the advance in Asia. Meanwhile, in Europe, France’s CAC (-0.9%) leads the decline. S&P futures are higher by 4.50 basis points at 2116.25.

Apple reports following today’s closing bell. Wall Street is looking for earnings of $US2.14 per share on revenues of $US55.96 billion. Expectations call for 58.1 million iPhones to be sold.

US economic data is light. Flash Services PMI will cross the wires at 9:45 a.m. ET. The US 10-year yield is up 1 basis point at 1.92%.

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