Washington D.C. residents can ride in this adorable driverless shuttle starting this summer

Get ready, Washington D.C. residents: A driverless shuttle is hitting the streets.

Named Olli, the electric and autonomous shuttle was made by Local Motors — the creator of the first driveable, 3D-printed car. The shuttle uses IBM’s Watson supercomputer so passengers can make requests like asking it to drive downtown or change the temperature, according to a press release.

Olli is the first self-driving vehicle to use IBM’s Watson. It fits 12 people and uses Lidar, GPS, and external cameras to navigate. The shuttle can reach a top speed of 12 miles per hour with a range of 32 miles.

The shuttle will begin making trips on public roads in DC starting Thursday, but it will also make trips around the Miami area and Las Vegas by the end of 2016.

Olli was introduced with the opening of Local Motors new facility in National Harbour, Maryland. The facility showcases Local Motors’ 3D-printed cars and large-scale 3D printer.

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