Photos show New York City’s million-dollar homes that were once horse stables

Left: The author standing in front of a residential mews. Right: An archway leading to a cobblestone street of residential mews and cloudy skies.
There are mews all over New York City if you look for them. Joey Hadden/Insider
  • Some of New York City’s modern-day residences used to house horses.
  • These homes that were once horse stables are known as mews; now, some are worth millions.
  • I walked down four streets lined with million-dollar mews and found an escape from the hustle of the city.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

I visited four streets around New York City lined with horse stables that have been transformed into million-dollar homes.
The author in front of a house with a big white gate on Verandah Place
Me standing in front of a horse stable home. Joey Hadden/Insider
In Manhattan, a cobblestone alley between Fifth Avenue and Macdougal Street is home to a line of mews that used to be an artist hub, The New York Times reported in 1994.
Buildings behind a street sign for MacDougal.
An alley on Macdougal Street. Joey Hadden/Insider
In the early 20th century, sculptor Frederick Triebel stumbled upon a worn-down horse stable in MacDougal Alley and transformed it into a studio, according to The New York Times.
Trees in front of and to the side of a line of houses
Residences on MacDougal Alley seen over a fence. Joey Hadden/Insider
Other artists followed, The New York Sun reported in 2006.
A view of a residential block from above a fence with trees on the left side.
MacDougal Alley is in New York City. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: New York Sun
“In the summertime, the doors of the studios are thrown open, and the artists’ wives take their chairs on the clean, cemented court, while the children play in perfect safety around them,” the Craftsman magazine said of MacDougal Alley in 1906, according to the New York Sun.
Film photos of MacDougal Alley
Photos of MacDougal Alley taken in the mid-1900s. New York Public Library Digital Collections
Source: New York Sun
Notable artists like Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney who later established the Whitney Museum lived in the former stables in the early 1900s, where small homes like this one are now worth millions, according to Zillow.
Close up of a white, square house next yo two red, brick houses
Mews up close on MacDougal Alley. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Zillow
The stable Triebel transformed at 6 MacDougal Alley is now worth more than $US4 ($AU5) million on Zillow.
A line of red brick houses.
Greenery envelopes the side of a horse stable-turned-home. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Zillow
Just a few blocks away, I found another street in Greenwich Village that used to house horses.
A selfie of the author in front of Washington Mews
Me and the mews. Joey Hadden/Insider
Around the corner off of Fifth Avenue, you’ll find Washington Mews, a cobblestone street that looks like a “retreat” from the city, as The New York Times described it in 1988.
Cobblestone streets lined with mews in the mid 1900s and today
Washington Mews in the mid-1900s and today. New York Public Library Digital Collections/Joey Hadden/Insider
The north side of the street is lined with two story buildings that used to be horse stables, according to the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.
A cobblestone street in front of white residential mews with pink and teal accents.
The north side of the street. Joey Hadden/Insider
By 1916, cars were becoming more popular and replacing horses and carriages, so Sailors’ Snug Harbor, which owned the stables, transformed them into artist studios, according to The New York Times.
A white, windowless home with two bushy trees in front of it and a red house to the left.
Washington Mews homes. Joey Hadden/Insider
The quaint street became an artist hub after that, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation reported.
A brick gated block in the mid 1900s and today
Washington Mews in the mid-1900s and today. Joey Hadden/Insider
By 1949, Sailors’ Snug Harbor leased the space to New York University, according to the same source.
A red brick gated cobblestone street lined with mews.
A gate opening into Washington Mews. Joey Hadden/Insider
These artist dwellings are now worth millions. This two-bedroom home is likely worth just under $US8 ($AU11) million, according to Trulia.
A white van parked on the left in front of a white and periwinkle houses with greenery growing from it
64 Washington Mews. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Trulia
Head to Brooklyn for more mews in Cobble Hill. To get there, take the F or G train to Bergen Street Station.
Bergen St Station FG trains Brooklyn
Bergen Street Station. Joey Hadden/Insider
A few blocks away, you’ll find Verandah Place. The street sign is slightly hidden under a tree.
Verandah place sign in front of a tree on a sidewalk
A sign for Verandah Place. Joey Hadden/Insider
Across the street from the sign, you’ll find the mews on Verandah Place next to Cobble Hill Park.
A street with a shaded park on the right and mews on the left.
The mews at Verandah Place. Joey Hadden/Insider
Some of the mostly three-story buildings you’ll find there were originally built as horse stables in the 20th century, while others were built as cottages, according to Untapped Cities. Now, they’re all residences.
A row of residential mews on a street shaded by trees.
Homes on Verandah Place. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Untapped Cities
The street is only 20 feet (6.10m) wide and 1.5 blocks long, the same source reports.
A row of residential mews on a street shaded by trees.
A view of the homes from a nearby park. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Untapped Cities
Some homes on this street are worth millions, according to Zillow.
A row of residential mews on a street shaded by trees.
Million-dollar homes are seen. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Zillow
Trees from the adjacent park shade most of the street.
A row of residential mews on a street shaded by trees.
A shady spot on the street. Joey Hadden/Insider
For more Brooklyn mews, you can take the 4, 5, 2, 3, or R trains to Borough Hall station.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
Borough Hall station in Brooklyn Heights. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Insider
A short walk away from the subway station, you’ll find Hunts Lane off of Henry Street between Joralemon Street and Remsen Street.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
Hunts Lane is a dead-end street. Joey Hadden/Insider
Once home to horses, according to The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, the dead-end street is rooted in history.
Hunts lane
A view of Hunts Lane in 1935 and 2021. MCNY/Gottscho-Schleisner / Contributor/Joey Hadden/Insider
In 1944, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle described the quaint block as “a little bit of New England in Brooklyn Heights.”
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
Carriage houses on Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
Back then, families, artists, writers, and police horses lived on Hunts Lane, according to the same article.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
A stroller, table, and chairs outside of a home on Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
A mother who said she lived on the street in 1944 told The Brooklyn Daily Eagle that year that the neighborhood’s residents were very close, and families helped one another.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
The dead-end of the street is seen from beneath a tree. Joey Hadden/Insider
“The policemen’s horses are stabled over here and the children have a marvelous time watching them at the changing of the guard,” the resident told The Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1944.
Hunts lane
A view of 14 Hunts Lane in 1935 and 2021. MCNY/Gottscho-Schleisner / Contributor/Joey Hadden/Insider
Today, those carriage houses are luxury apartments and multimillion-dollar homes, as Brownstoner reported.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
A close-up of the entry to 14 Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Brownstoner
When I wandered down the dead-end street, it was quiet and seemingly empty.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
If not for lights turning on and off in the windows showing signs of life, I would have thought the street had been abandoned.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
A brick home on Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
I usually feel rushed walking on most Brooklyn streets, but Hunts Lane was so calm and peaceful. I felt like I was at a private museum viewing works of art.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
A view of Hunts Lane from the dead end. Joey Hadden/Insider
I got a close look at some of the expensive homes, like a condo at 8 Hunts Lane, which is estimated to be worth more than $US4 ($AU5) million, according to Zillow.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
The outside of 8 Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: Zillow
This stunning red-brick carriage house at the beginning of the block is 4 Hunts Lane. It’s a modern $US6.5 ($AU9)-million home with a garage and basement, according to 6sqft.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
The home at 4 Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
Source: 6sqft
While the carriage houses are all roughly the same shape, different paint jobs and details make each one look unique.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
14 and 16 Hunts Lane. Joey Hadden/Insider
Some houses look like they are being reclaimed by nature with greenery lining the exteriors.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
Plants cover parts of a carriage-house exterior. Joey Hadden/Insider
Visiting all four streets made me feel like I was stepping out of the city for a second, and that was the coolest part.
Hunts lane hidden brooklyn nyc
Me on Hunts Lane in Brooklyn. Joey Hadden/Insider