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Now Carnegie Clean Energy is in battery talks with South Australia

Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images

Carnegie Clean Energy says it’s in talks with South Australia to build a battery solution for the state’s electricity network.

Carnegie says it is, through its 100% subsidiary Energy Made Clean, the largest provider of utility scale battery storage solutions in Australia.

A short time ago, the company’s shares were up 21% to $0.073 on an earlier announcement that the new WA Labor government had confirmed support for a wave energy project on the state’s south coast.

Tesla’s Elon Musk on Friday promised to fix South Australia’s blackout problem in 100 days — or hand over $200 million in batteries for free.

Since then Atlasssian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes, who challenged fellow billionaire Musk to make the claim a reality, has been inundated with support for the plan from the Australian business community. He’s also talking to prime minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Carnegie’s managing director, Dr Michael Ottaviano, confirmed that he was in discussions with the South Australian government on a home-grown battery energy storage solution.

“South Australia has led the country in the deployment of renewable energy and now needs significant energy storage to assist in the stabilisation of the electricity network and to position it for additional renewable energy growth as it moves to further decarbonise its economy,” he says.

Last September, South Australia was hit by a 1-in-50-years storm which brought now major power lines, leaving the state without power.

The disaster resulted in a political fight over the state’s renewable energy policy, an argument that has since become national as the federal government attempts to attack the Labor states over the renewable energy targets, claiming they are too high.

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