Newspapers With D.C. Bureaus Down By A Half Since 1985

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The Pew Research centre put out a new report on journalism in Washington D.C. and came up with some eye-brow raisers.

Quotes from Journalism.org:

  • “Since the 1980s, the number of newspapers accredited to cover Congress has fallen by two thirds. The number claiming a presence in Washington generally, according to capitol directories, has fallen by more than half.”
  • “In 2008, newspapers from only 23 states had reporters based in Washington covering federal government, according to the listings of Hudson’s Washington News Media Contacts Directory. That is down by a third from 35 states listed in the directory’s 1985 edition—and that was before a host of further cutbacks late in 2008.”
  • “The decline in mainstream press has been nearly matched by a sharp growth among more narrowly focused special interest or niche media. The number of specialty newspapers, magazines and newsletters has risen by half since the mid-1980s. Newsletters alone are up nearly two thirds.”
  • “When the U.S. State Department first opened a Foreign Press centre for representatives of non-U.S. media in 1968, there were about 160 foreign correspondents reporting from Washington. In October, 2008, there were nearly 10 times as many.”

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