The New York Times corrected its estimate of the crowd size at a Trump rally after Trump complained

  • After President Donald Trump called out The New York Times for incorrectly estimating the size of the crowd at a rally in Tennessee, the paper made the correction and responded by saying, “When we get it wrong, we say so.”
  • While The Times initially reported that roughly 1,000 supporters attended Tuesday’s rally in Nashville, the fire marshal said that approximately 5,500 were in attendance.

After President Donald Trump called out The New York Times for incorrectly estimating the size of the crowd at a Tuesday rally in Tennessee, the paper issued a correction on Wednesday.

The correction came after Trump publicly lambasted the paper onTwitter for underestimating the number of people in attendance at the rally.

“The Failing and Corrupt @nytimes estimated the crowd last night at ‘1000 people,’ when in fact it was many times that number – and the arena was rockin'”, Trump tweeted on Wednesday morning. “This is the way they demean and disparage. They are very dishonest people who don’t ‘get’ me, and never did!”

While The Times initially reported that roughly 1,000 supporters attended Tuesday’s rally in Nashville, the fire marshal said that approximately 5,500 people were in attendance.

“An earlier version of this article cited an incorrect figure for the number of people attending President Trump’s rally,” the online version of the correction read. “While no exact figure is available, the fire marshal’s office estimated that approximately 5,500 people attended the rally, not about 1,000 people.”

New York Times White House reporter Julie Davis took to Twitter and addressed the correction. “President @realDonaldTrump is correct about his crowd last night,” Davis tweeted. “My estimate was way off, and we have corrected our story to reflect the fire marshal’s estimate of 5,500 people. When we get it wrong, we say so.”

NOW WATCH: Briefing videos

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.