A 7-Eleven owner has been charged after selling bootleg hand sanitizer that chemically burned at least 4 children, police say

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A New Jersey 7-Eleven owner was arrested after police said she sold makeshift hand sanitizer that chemically burned four children. Facebook/River Vale Police Department
  • A 7-Eleven owner in the US has been charged with child endangerment and deceptive business practices after police said she sold makeshift hand sanitizer that burned four children.
  • Authorities said the owner sold roughly a dozen bottles of the bootleg sanitizer before officers arrived and seized her remaining supply.
  • NorthJersey.com reported that the owner created the mixture by combining commercial sanitizer with water and selling it in spray bottles.
  • State prosecutors issued a warning to retailers who “try to make a quick buck by exploiting others” during the coronavirus pandemic.
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New Jersey prosecutors have charged a 7-Eleven owner, alleging she sold bootleg hand sanitizer that caused chemical burns on at least four children.

The River Vale Police Department posted a photo of the makeshift sanitizer sold in spray bottles and marketed as “Spray Sanitizer.”

The owner, Manisha Bharade, has been charged with child endangerment and deceptive business practices. NorthJersey.com reported that Bharade had created the bootleg sanitizer by mixing commercial sanitizer with water.

Authorities said they were alerted to the issue after a photo on social media showed “a young boy with apparent burns to his arm and leg.”

Officers then went to the store and seized the remaining products. They said roughly a dozen of the spray bottles were sold to customers on March 9.

“Our first priority is to make the public aware that they should not use this item if they purchased it at the River Vale 7-Eleven,” Lt. John DeVoe said in a statement.

New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal tweeted a warning to retailers who “try to make a quick buck by exploiting others” during the coronavirus pandemic that has killed 31 people in the US so far, sickened at least 1,150 others, and prompted people to stockpile items like hand sanitizer.

“Let me be perfectly clear. If you try to take advantage of our residents during a public health emergency, we will hold you accountable,” Grewal said.