Nearly 20% of Australians have attempted a 'risky selfie' on holiday. They might be better off opting for a digital detox.

What lengths would you go to for the perfect selfie? (Photo by Samo Vidic/Red Bull via Getty Images)
  • Research commissioned by ING bank found 18% of Australian travellers have taken a “risky selfie” — going to extreme lengths to take the perfect holiday snap such as posing with wild animals or standing on cliffs.
  • Millennials are most likely to attempt these photos (29%), while men (25%) are more likely to take part in them compared to women, according to the research (10%).
  • It also found more Australians are ditching thrill-seeking holidays for more relaxing holidays, with eager to escape digital devices and invigorate their mind and body.

What lengths would you go to for the perfect selfie?

Research commissioned by bank ING has found “risky selfies” to be a potential new danger for Australian travellers.

The research — compiled off the back of a YouGov Galaxy survey of 1,001 Australians between 18 and 69 years old — found 18% of Australian travellers have taken a risky selfie, going to extremes to get that perfect holiday snap by posing with wild animals, standing on cliffs or ignoring warning signs.

Millennials are most likely to attempt these photos (29%) while men are more likely to take part in them (25%) compared to women (10%).

It also found more Australians are ditching thrill-seeking holidays for more relaxing holidays. The main reasons? To help wean them off their digital devices (48%) and to invigorate their mind and body (45%).

In addition 30% of respondents believed they are much safer when taking a ‘chill’ trip. And some of the most popular types of laid-back holiday opitons including a beach trip, catching up with the family and taking a river or ocean cruise.

But despite Aussies flocking to crack a few bevvies by the beach, travellers are still getting affected by mishaps while travelling.

The most common issues were cancelled or delayed flights followed by food poisoning or an illness, getting conned out of money and risky selfies.

Around 53% of Australians found themselves financially impacted when they were involved in a problem or accident while on holiday, losing an average of $1,426, the bank said in a statement outlining the research.

ING head of wealth, Cathy Duncan, said, “Aussies are leading busier lives than ever, so it’s no wonder people are using their holidays as a time to relax, unwind and disconnect.

“But unfortunately, the most common travel mishaps can happen no matter what type of vacation you choose – from lost luggage, to unexpected flight cancellations.”

Research from the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health found 259 deaths occurred while taking selfies in 137 incidents between October 2011 to November 2017.

The highest number of incidents and selfie-deaths have been reported in India followed by Russia, the US and Pakistan.

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