The 10 Steps To Motorola's Plan For Global Smartphone Domination

Sanjay Jha Motorola laptop dock

Photo: Engadget

Motorola’s CEO Sanjay Jha spoke at the Oppenheimer Annual Technology & Communications Conference yesterday answering questions about the company’s mobile strategy through the end of 2011.We learned a lot.

Jha said Motorola has a lot in store for the second half of the year, including some new tablets. He also touched on the competition, and where he thinks the Windows Phone platform fits in.

Keep reading for the most interesting things we learned from the keynote. You can also listen to the entire thing right here.

What makes an Android device successful?

First and foremost, Jha says strong relationships with carriers are important. Carriers are the ones selling phones from their retail locations, so its important to be a good partner.

Jha notably mentioned that Motorola doesn't have plans to work with T-Mobile until the whole AT&T merger thing gets settled.

Everyone's going crazy about tablets, but smartphones are more important

Jha said he thinks smartphones are much more important for mobile computing than tablets. That being said, Motorola still plans on releasing at least one more tablet this year.

Motorola's latest phones have been selling better than expected

Jha said he did not expect the Droid X2, Droid 3, and Photon 4G to sell as well as they have been this summer. In fact, he said many stores have been selling out of the devices.

Motorola plans to place all its Android devices under a common brand

Jha is taking a page out of Samsung's marketing book. He said Motorola is considering launching new Android devices under a common brand, just like Samsung does with its 'Galaxy' phones and tablets.

We've seen some speculation that Motorola could choose its recently acquired 'Kore' domain for these devices.

There will be a major push for HTML 5 apps

Jha has picked up on the trend of developers making HTML 5-based web apps that can run in the browser of pretty much any mobile device. He says these apps will continue to grow.

We've already seen this with a few magazine apps. Plus Amazon and Vudu just announced their own HTML 5 apps designed to deliver content by circumventing Apple's App Store in-app purchase rules.

In the long run, the smartphone market won't be able to support all 5 major mobile operating systems

Jha says iOS and Android are here to stay. But when it comes to HP's WebOS, BlackBerry OS, or Windows Phone 7, some will have to die off.

Motorola is open to creating Windows Phones, but wants to wait a bit longer

Jha doesn't rule out making a Windows Phone 7 device, but says he would prefer to keep Motorola's resources invested in Android. If Windows Phone ends up taking off, we may see one from Moto in the future.

There were problems with the Xoom launch

Jha admitted there were three main things wrong with the Xoom launch back in February:

  • It needed a more competitive price point.
  • It needed more apps and access to better content.
  • It needed to launch globally with a Wi-Fi model in addition to the 3G model.

Motorola's next generation of tablets will be a lot better

After learning from its mistakes with the Xoom, Jha said the Motorola's next tablets will have a more competitive form factor (i.e. thinner and lighter like the iPad and Galaxy Tab 10.1), and will offer more access to multimedia content. (We're guessing that means some sort of music and video store.)

What about the next version of Android, 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich?

When asked about Android's next version, 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, Jha said he would like Motorola to manufacture the first device to run it, but there are a ton of risks involved.

Bottom line: we're guessing another manufacturer has Google's blessing to make the first Ice Cream Sandwich phone.

But can Motorola stand up to Apple?

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