Here Are The 20 Most Shared Articles On Facebook In 2011

slutty halloween costumesAn article about dressing like tramps made the top 5.

Photo: Stinkie Pinkie via Flickr

Facebook just posted a list of the most shared articles on Facebook in 2011.They range from the serious (articles about the tsunami in Japan) to the silly (“No, Your Zodiac Sign Hasn’t Changed”).

There’s even an article about a giant crocodile that made the list.

We’ll walk you through the top 20 articles shared on Facebook this year.

20. Scientists warn California could be struck by winter 'superstorm' (Yahoo)

19. Ryan Dunn Dead: 'Jackass' Star Dies In Car Crash (The Huffington Post)

18. A Sister's Eulogy for Steve Jobs (New York Times)

17. Why You're Not Married (The Huffington Post)

Why You're Not Married (The Huffington Post)

16. Man robs bank to get medical care in jail (Yahoo)

15. (video) - Twin Baby Boys Have A Conversation! (Yahoo)

14.Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior (Wall Street Journal)

Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior (Wall Street Journal)

13. Stop Coddling the Super-Rich (New York Times)

12. How to Talk to Little Girls (The Huffington Post)

How to Talk to Little Girls (The Huffington Post)

11. Parents keep child's gender under wraps (Yahoo)

10. New Zodiac Sign Dates: Ophiuchus The 13th Sign? (The Huffington Post)

9. Giant crocodile captured alive in Philippines (Yahoo)

8. Dog in Japan stays by the side of ailing friend in the rubble (Yahoo)

7. You'll freak when you see the new Facebook (CNN)

6. At funeral, dog mourns the death of Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan (Yahoo)

5. (video) - Father Daughter Dance Medley (Yahoo)

4. Parents, don't dress your girls like tramps (CNN)

3. No, your zodiac sign hasn't changed (CNN)

2. What teachers really want to tell parents (CNN)

1. Satellite Photos of Japan, Before and After the Quake and Tsunami (New York Times)

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