The 22 Most Segregated Cities In America

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Racial segregation has been declining since the 1970s but it clearly exists.For example, the average black person lives in a neighbourhood that is 45 per cent black. Without segregation, his neighbourhood would be only 13 per cent black.

The slow decline of segregation was revealed in 2010 census data and analysis by professors at Brown and Florida State University.

John Logan and Brian Stults created a dissimilarity index, which identifies the percentage of one group that would have to move to a different neighbourhood to eliminate segregation — think busing.

A score above 60 on the dissimilarity index is considered very high segregation. 22 metropolitan areas crossed this threshold.

#22 Houston, Texas has a 60.6 white-black dissimilarity score

60.6% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 65.1 in 2000; 65.5 in 1990; and 73.7 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#21 Salinas, Calif. has a 60.9 white-HISPANIC dissimilarity score

60.9% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-Hispanic segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity increased from 58.8 in 2000; 56.9 in 1990; and 55.1 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#20 Washington D.C. has a 61.0 white-black dissimilarity score

61% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 63.0 in 2000; 65.5 in 1990; and 69.7 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#19 Boston, Mass. has a 61.5 white-black dissimilarity score

61.5 % of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 66.0 in 2000; 68.5 in 1990; and 74.6 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#18 New York has a 62.0 white-HISPANIC dissimilarity score

60.9% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-Hispanic segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity increased from 58.8 in 2000; 56.9 in 1990; and 55.1 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#17 Los Angeles has a 62.2 white-HISPANIC dissimilarity score

62.2% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-Hispanic segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 62.5 in 2000; but increased from 60.3 in 1990; and 57.1 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#16 Memphis, Tenn. has a 62.2 white-black dissimilarity score

62.2% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 65.7 in 2000; 65.5 in 1990; and 68.8 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#15 Pittsburgh, Pa. has a 63.1 white-black dissimilarity score

63.1% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 67.4 in 2000; 70.8 in 1990; and 73.3 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#14 New Orleans has a 63.3 white-black dissimilarity score

63.3% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 69.0 in 2000; 68.3 in 1990; and 70.0 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#13 Miami, Fla. has a 64 white-black dissimilarity score

64% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 68.5 in 2000; 74 in 1990; and 82.1 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#12 Baltimore, Md. has a 64.3 white-black dissimilarity score

64.3% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 67.6 in 2000; 71.4 in 1990; and 74.4 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#11 Indianapolis, Ind. has a 64.5 white-black dissimilarity score

64.5% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 71.0 in 2000; 74.4 in 1990; and 78.8 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#10 Los Angeles has a 65.2 white-black dissimilarity score

65.2% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 68.1 in 2000; 72.8 in 1990; and 81.0 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#9 Birmingham, Ala. has a 65.2 white-black dissimilarity score

65.2% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 68.9 in 2000; 70.3 in 1990; and 72.2 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#8 Cincinnati, Ohio has a 66.9 white-black dissimilarity score

66.9% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 72.6 in 2000; 75.9 in 1990; and 78.2 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#7 Philadelphia, Pa. has a 67 white-black dissimilarity score

67% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 70.3 in 2000; 75.2 in 1990; and 77.2 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#6 St. Louis, Mo. has a 70.6 white-black dissimilarity score

70.6% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 73.4 in 2000; 77.2 in 1990; and 81.6 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#5 Cleveland, Ohio has a 72.6 white-black dissimilarity score

72.6% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 77.2 in 2000; 82.8 in 1990; and 85.8 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#4 Detroit has a 74 white-black dissimilarity score

74.0% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 84.9 in 2000; 87.6 in 1990; and 87.6 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#3 Chicago has a 75.2 white-black dissimilarity score

75.2% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 80.4 in 2000; 84.4 in 1990; and 88.1 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#2 New York City, N.Y. has a 76.9 white-black dissimilarity score

79.6% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 82.2 in 2000; 82.8 in 1990; and 83.9 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

#1 Milwaukee, Wisc. has a 79.6 white-black dissimilarity score

79.6% of one group would have to move to a different census tract for white-black segregation to be eliminated.

Dissimilarity decreased from 82.2 in 2000; 82.8 in 1990; and 83.9 in 1980.

Data provided by John R. Logan at Brown University and Brian J. Stults at Florida State University. Slides refer to the largest city in a given metro area. A dissimilarity score above 60 is considered very high.

At least segregation is declining. But inequality is getting worse

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