Morgan Stanley reportedly kept on a broker it knew was accused of violence against women

General view of Morgan Stanley’s UK headquarters, in Canary Wharf, London. The bank is one of several rumoured to be planning a move to Frankfurt after the UK’s decision to leave the European Union. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday November 23rd, 2016. Photo credit should read: Matt Crossick/PA Wire (Photo by Matt Crossick/PA Images via Getty Images)

Morgan Stanley kept on a star broker the bank knew faced multiple allegations of violence against former wives and girlfriends,The New York Times reported Wednesday.

The report said the bank didn’t put him on leave until the Times reporter Emily Flitter called with questions this week.

Here are the main takeaways from the story:

  • Over 15 years, four women sought police protection from Doug Greenberg, a star broker in a wealthy suburb of Portland, Oregon.
  • “For years, Morgan Stanley executives knew about his alleged conduct, according to seven former Morgan Stanley employees,” the report says. “Morgan Stanley received a federal subpoena related to one abuse allegation, according to a lawyer for one of the women. In another instance, a Morgan Stanley manager alerted his superior when Mr. Greenberg was charged with violating a restraining order, according to three former employees.”
  • Per The Times, Greenberg is in the top 2% of the bank’s brokers by revenue produced.
  • Morgan Stanley put Greenberg on administrative leave this week after Flitter called the bank for comment. In a statement, Morgan Stanley told Business Insider: “Mr. Greenberg has been placed on administrative leave pending further review of this situation. We are committed to maintaining a safe and professional work environment and will take appropriate action based on the facts of the matter.”
  • Reached on his phone this week, Greenberg told The Times that he had no comment, saying, “It’s interesting that a reporter from New York would somehow have all this information just on her own.”

Read the full New York Times story ยป

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