We may have just got some new details about Apple's rumoured smaller iPhone

IPhone 5c coloursJustin Sullivan/Getty ImagesThe iPhone 5c is displayed at an Apple Store.

A report from Chinese website MyDrivers (which we discovered via 9to5Mac) gives new details about the hardware of the iPhone 6c, Apple’s rumoured smaller phone that picks up where the iPhone 5c left off.

The 6c could come with an A9 processor (like the iPhone 6s), 16GB of storage, TouchID, and 2GB of RAM. The specs would indicate that the iPhone 6c would be as powerful as the iPhone 6s.

The report also claims that Apple is going to include a 1,642mAh battery, making it slightly larger than the iPhone 5c which had 1,510mAh. The iPhone 6s has a 1,715mAh battery, but that is powering a larger screen.

Previous rumours have suggested that Apple is looking to introduce the smaller iPhone 6c in April, according to reports. Apple usually only launches phones in September/October, so it is unclear if it would launch alongside the iPhone 7 or as a standalone product.

The iPhone 5c was a slightly cheaper model that was popular in international markets outside of North America. However, the device never became as successful as the more expensive models.

The iPhone 5c was made out of colourful plastic — which Apple described as “unapologetically plastic” — clearly differentiating it from the metal iPhone 5S. According to reports, the 6c will “resemble an upgraded iPhone 5S,” meaning it is made of aluminium rather than plastic.

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