If iPhone/Android Apps Are Your Business, You Have To See These Charts

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Photo: Nielsen

The business of mobile applications is exploding, driven by the growth of smartphones like the iPhone and Android handsets.Nielsen took a long look at the app market, and compiled a great overview filled with handy charts. A few key take aways:

  • Gaming is the biggest category of mobile applications.
  • Facebook is the most popular individual app.
  • Free apps actually lead to sales.
  • Advertising in mobile apps is good for Google because people search for more information about a brand they see in an app.

Games are more popular than any other category of application.

The gaming market must be heavily fractured. Even though gaming is the most popular category, Facebook is the most popular application.

App stores are the number one driver of app downloads on feature phones...

...and on smartphones. It appears people don't surf the app store through iTunes on the desktop, which is somewhat surprising.

43% of the people downloading a free, lite version of an iPhone app eventually decide to get the full paid version. On the BlackBerry, the rate is only 21%.

Duh -- The number one thing people want in their app billing is convenience.

And that usually means just paying their carrier for simplicity's sake.

Don't waste your time advertising to oldsters in your app. They're not paying attention.

Android users click on more ads than anyone else -- any ideas about why?

iAds don't pull you out of your app because users HATE when they leave their app for an ad.

Good news for Google -- mobile ads drive people to search engines, or to the web for more information.

Apps aren't as popular on handheld devices that aren't mobile phones.

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