Miyamoto's "Secret Project" Nintendo's Potential Ace In The Hole

It’s been a while since Nintendo created a new intellectual property as big as Mario and Zelda, by no means a criticism. The company had an incredible run in the 80s and 90s and used its many franchises to dominate the industry across multiple decades. If only all publishers could be so fortunate.

That said, the fact that legendary game designer Shigeru Miyamoto is up to something fills me with excitement, and why not? This is the same genius that delivered Mario and Zelda, along with Pikmin and Nintendogs.

With this in mind, his “secret project” is without question one of the most important stories of 2012, one that I feel has gotten somewhat lost amid talks of the Wii U, Xbox 720 and PlayStation 4.

Not hard to see why, since it’s tough speculating what the man’s up to. Is it for Wii U or 3DS? Is it even a video game at all? Does it star a character everyone’s familiar with, or is Miyamoto hard at work dreaming up another hero, one to stand alongside the portly plumber and Link? That’s an exciting thought.

On the flip side, what if it bombs or simply fails to live up to the lofty standards by which hardcore Nintendo fans hold Miyamoto? Although the critically panned Wii Music debuted in 2008, memories of this poorly received experiment still linger.

Perhaps Miyamoto has lost his creative touch.

On a more understandable level, perhaps his creative stroke won’t have the same impact it once did. After all, the video game industry is significantly bigger than it was in the 80s. Competition is greater. Expectations much higher.

Ultimately, Miyamoto holds at least part of Nintendo’s future in his hands, and this product/game may shape the big N for years to come. This isn’t something to dismiss. It’s huge.

For now, we wait.

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