Here are millennials' favourite neighborhoods in 6 big US cities

The Generationed City project at the University of Waterloo, led by Professor Markus Moos, seeks to understand the social, economic, and geographic characteristics of different age groups in the United States and Canada. One of their projects is to map which cities and neighborhoods have the highest concentrations of young adults.

The maps show the location quotients of adults aged 25-34 for neighborhoods in a number of major North American cities. Location quotients measure relative geographic concentration by comparing the proportion of young adults in each neighbourhood to the proportion in the overall metropolitan area.

Higher location quotients, represented by darker colouring in the maps, indicate neighborhoods that have a higher concentration of young adults than the metro area as a whole. In the darkest red neighborhoods, young adults are over twice as common as they are in the overall metro area.

In New York City, much of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens have more millennials than the NYC metro area overall. Hoboken and Jersey City also have some young adult heavy block groups:

San Francisco and Oakland have higher concentrations of young adults than the overall metro area:

Millennials are common in the western neighborhoods of Washington, DC:

Millennials are highly concentrated on the north side of Chicago:

Young adults are a bit more spread out in Los Angeles:

Boston’s city core has a high rate of 25-34 year olds:

To see more cities, and to take a survey furthering the team’s research on millennials, check out Generationed City’s website here.

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