Military Marching Makes Soldiers Fear The Enemy Less: Study

The Queen’s Guard marching during the Trooping Of The Colour. Bethany Clarke/Getty Images

People marching in step perceive potential enemies as less threatening than if they’re walking independently of each other, say US scientists

From military drills to religious rituals, synchronised behaviour is common in human institutions.

Dr Daniel Fessler of the University of California and colleagues asked men to walk in pairs, either in synch or not.

Those who experienced synchrony estimated an angry man to be less physically formidable than those who did not.

“There may thus be a dark side to synchrony, as it shapes how people think about their opponents, potentially paving the way for violence,” the scientists write in the journal Royal Society Journal Biology Letters.

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