Microsoft: 'We share the concerns' over Trump's immigration order and are giving employees legal help

Satya NadellaANDREW HARRER / BLOOMBERG VIA GETTYMicrosoft CEO Satya Nadella

Microsoft is providing “legal advice and assistance” to employees who might be affected by President Donald Trump’s executive action on immigration, the company says.

On Friday, Donald Trump signed an executive order for “extreme vetting” that halted the US’ refugee program and blocked citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for at least 90 days — even people who already have visas and legal permits to live in the United States.

The countries affected are Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

“We share the concerns about the impact of the executive order on our employees from the listed countries, all of whom have been in the United States lawfully, and we’re actively working with them to provide legal advice and assistance,” says a Microsoft spokesperson.

Earlier this week, Microsoft tucked language into its quarterly earnings report, warning that “we are limited in our ability to recruit internationally by restrictive domestic immigration laws,” and that “changes to U.S. immigration policies that restrain the flow of technical and professional talent may inhibit our ability to adequately staff our research and development efforts.”

Google CEO Sundar Pichai and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg have both spoken out against President Trump’s immigration action. “It’s painful to see the personal cost of this executive order on our colleagues,” Pichai wrote in an email to Google employees.

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