Photographer Creates Surreal Images Of The Housing Crisis

Michael Jantzen

Photo: Image courtesy of Michael Jantzen

Designer Michael Jantzen plays with perspective both literally and figuratively. His photo collection, “Deconstructing the Houses,” rotates parts of buildings to give the appearance of fragmentation. Doing so is meant to change our view of McMansions from lifelong investment to money pit.

“I picked out houses that were very large and expensive to work with,” he told Business Insider in an interview. “The idea that these very expensive places, so many of which are in foreclosure, struck me. I wanted to play with the idea of stability.” 

Then he turned his lens to to the American McMansion.

The first images were literally cut out with a knife and rotated by hand.

A recent Trulia study found more Americans were setting their sights on McMansions. However, our dreams might be bigger than our budgets.

The average McMansion is 3,200 square feet or more. Today's inventory of homes—most of which were foreclosures—are only 800-2,000 square feet.

Funny how much can change after a housing crisis.

Now read the stories behind the housing crisis ...

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