Why Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's son, Archie, doesn't have a royal title, unlike Kate Middleton and Prince William's children

WPA Pool/Getty ImagesMeghan Markle and Prince Harry aren’t including a title in Archie’s name for now.

On Wednesday, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry introduced the world to their new son in a private photo call in Windsor Castle.

They later revealed in an Instagram post that the baby’s name is Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, and many people noticed the lack of a title in his full name.

Sources close to Buckingham Palace told INSIDER that Meghan and Harry had chosen not to bestow a courtesy title on their son for now.

ArchieWPA Pool/Getty ImagesArchie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.

The Daily Mail’s royal correspondent Rebecca English first reported that Archie did not have a royal title and would be known as “Master Archie.”

Royal tradition dictates that the great-grandchildren of the sovereign who are not in the direct line of succession are not given the title of prince or princess at birth, nor are they styled as HRH. Instead, they are given the last name Mountbatten-Windsor, the official surname of all descendants of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip.

According to The Independent, the tradition was set in 1917 by a letters patent issued by King George V, Harry’s great-great-grandfather, that limited the title of prince or princess, saying that “the grandchildren of the sons of any such Sovereign in the direct male line (save only the eldest living son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales) shall have and enjoy in all occasions the style and title enjoyed by the children of Dukes of these Our Realms.”

Meghan harry archiWPA Pool/Getty ImagesArchie with his parents.


Read more:
Prince William and Kate Middleton are ‘delighted’ their kids are getting a new royal cousin, but Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s baby won’t have the same title

Under this rule, only Prince George, as “the eldest living son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales,” was born with a title.

But the Queen issued a letters patent in 2012 that said that “all the children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales should have and enjoy the style, title and attribute of royal highness with the titular dignity of Prince or Princess prefixed to their Christian names or with such other titles of honour.”

This rule allowed for Kate Middleton and Prince William to use courtesy titles for Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.

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