A 34-Year OId Billionaire Heiress Who Used To Work For Goldman Just Bought Escada

Photo: This is London

Megha Mittal, the daughter-in-law of the richest man in Europe, Lakshmi Mittal (who’s worth $28.7 billion), left Goldman Sachs after just one year as a tech analyst.¬†Now, she’s married to the (expected) future CEO of the giant steel company ArcelorMittal, and she recently¬†won a bidding war for the luxury clothing brand Escada, in December 2009.

Mittal started her career at Wharton, which she loved. She tells This is London:

“I loved it. It was very international. I think you really got a very good sense of the wider world, especially coming from India.

“Also, I was alone for the first time, away from family, so it was quite character building. And I met my husband there [Aditya, who is now the chief financial officer at ArcelorMittal, the steel company his father owns].”

Then in 2000, she got a job as a tech analyst at Goldman, but she left after only a year.

“I felt a very strong pull to do something creative.”

“But I always loved fashion, too. Design and fashion are different businesses but they are driven by aesthetics, creative vision, innovation and passion, so it was a natural progression for me.”

Despite flaming out of Goldman before finishing the 2-year analyst program, she still stays somewhat connected to finance; she attends the World Economic Forum at Davos every year.

“It has the best minds in business, politics, the arts, culture, you name it, every industry, who come together to discuss the state of the world. It is really stimulating.”

We know what this story sounds like, a young girl who fell in love with a goldmine, but Mittal promises it’s not like that:

“This is not a short-term proposition for me. I feel a great responsibility, first to the 2,000 staff, and also to the brand, its heritage and its history.”

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