This matchmaking service matches you with people who look like your ex

Three day ruleThree Day RuleThe homepage of Three Day Rule.

When Adelle Gomelsky Kelleher signed up for the matchmaking service Three Day Rule, she felt surprised by her match. He had blonde hair and blue eyes, which looked nothing like her type (dark hair and brown eyes).

But Three Day Rule isn’t like most dating services. Instead of personality quizzes or a swiping interface, it uses machine learning and facial recognition software to find clients matches.

Founded in 2013, the startup believes people are attracted to particular face shapes. It asks clients (who join for upwards of $7,000) for photos of their exes, and then pairs them with users in its database who have similar facial structures.

Three Day Rule’s CEO, Talia Goldstein, explains on a recent episode of our podcast Codebreaker:

“It would be so nice if I could just snap a photo, it recognises your face, and then tells me information about you,” she says. “And then, in person I can say, ‘Oh I see that you’re into X Y and Z. I totally have a match for you’ in real-time.”


“I never thought of it as ‘here are pictures of failures,'”Adelle Gomelsky Kelleher tells Codebreaker host Ben Johnson. Click for full episodes. 

Three Day Rule is constantly collecting photos of users (who sign up for free), and adding them to its database. The more photos its system has, the better matches it surfaces — which suggests a computer might know more about your romantic type than you possibly could.

To learn more, check out Codebreaker’s first episode of season two. And subscribe on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. 

NOW WATCH: This hidden iPhone feature will boost your reception

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.