These renders show what Apple might have planned for the successor to the iPhone X

Martin Hajek/iDropNewsThe iPhone XI (right) rendered next to the iPhone X (left).

Sometime later this Autumn, Apple is expected to unveil its new iPhone lineup. It’s not clear whether the company will stick to three models, like in 2017, or go back to two as it did in previous years.

Either way, there’s a good chance that the old form factor – which includes bezels at the top and bottom to make space for Touch ID – will disappear, and make way for new, iPhone X-inspired models where the display dominates the front.

Designer Martin Hajek, in collaboration with iDropNews, decided to take inspiration from all the rumours so far and created 3D renders of what he calls the “iPhone XI,” or “11,” which could give us a good visual hint of what Apple might actually unveil come September.

Here’s how the renders look:


It’s a refined iPhone X.

Martin Hajek/iDropNews

The iPhone XI doesn’t look groundbreaking.

But it shouldn’t: The iPhone X was the iPhone’s biggest redesign ever, and its new appearance didn’t just mean that its look was tweaked, but also its functionality.

For a relatively conservative firm like Apple – which needs to move accurately not to alienate its immense following – this was a big enough change already, so it’s reasonable not to expect them to do anything too drastic this year.


There is even less bezel.

Martin Hajek/iDropNews

What’s immediately noticeable about the iPhone XI’s front is that it presents even less bezel than the iPhone X.

Save for the notch, which remains at the top, the newly imagined model looks even more of an all-screen device than the X already does.

Hajek also imagines a dual-SIM version, which has been rumoured but doesn’t really line up with Apple’s history, so we wouldn’t hold our hopes up for that.


The notch gets smaller.

Martin Hajek/iDropNews

The iPhone XI doesn’t just reduce the bezel, however, but also the space occupied by the notch.

Rumours so far have claimed that Apple will not reduce the notch’s size until 2019, but with the heavy development behind the TrueDepth camera system, there might be a chance that Apple does tweak it in time.


And the camera is flush!

Martin Hajek/iDropNews

Hajek imagines another feature that iPhone owners would likely love: The elimination of the camera bump.

Apple introduced the iPhone 6 back in 2014, and its extremely slim profile forced the company to leave a bulge out of the casing, for the sensor inside was larger than the rest of the phone.

All the iPhones that followed retained that characteristic. Some may find it a distinctive design detail, but it is a compromise for the most part; eliminating it would not only be an aesthetic perk, but also a protection and handiness benefit.

An exposed camera is both more prone to scratches and annoying if you’re trying to lie the phone flat on a table, so being able to stick it back inside the case would probably be a good thing.


The changes would likely come to the high-end iPhones only.

Martin Hajek/iDropNews

The strongest and most-circulated rumour claims that three new iPhones will make their way to stores’ shelves this year.

Two of them will seemingly be direct successors to the iPhone X, in both 5.8- (like the current one) and 6.5-inch displays, with OLED (organic light-emitting diode) technology.

A third iPhone will reportedly use the newer all-screen design, too, but stick to a less expensive LCD (liquid crystal) display instead, and perhaps even a back aluminium, as opposed to glass.

If Hajek’s imagined improvements – like the smaller bezels and notch – do come to the iPhone XI (or whatever it’s called) this year, there’s a good chance that only the two more premium models will feature them.


An overall better-looking, more futuristic, elegant look.

Martin Hajek/iDropNews

Hajek’s reimagination tackles the few hardware annoyances reviewers have had with the iPhone X, from the excessive prominence of the notch to the camera bump on the back.

If you couple that with the even slimmer profile – which makes the screen look even bigger than it does on the X – you get a pretty sweet package to look forward to.

Here’s to hoping Apple is working to do just that.

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