Britain's biggest wine retailer just totally changed its business

Majestic Wine wants to transform itself from a retailer you visit once or twice a year to a mainstream shop by abolishing one of its most defining features — the six bottle minimum.

Majestic, Britain’s biggest specialist wine retailer, has a network of “warehouses” based outside of town centres and in unfashionable areas where it stocks crates of wine. It’s typically the shop you go to to stock up before a Christmas party or a big dinner party.

A big reason it’s only worth the occasional visit is because Majestic has a policy that customers have to buy a minimum of six bottles. That makes it more like a wholesaler such as Costco rather than a Tesco or Sainsbury’s.

But on Monday Majestic announced it is abolishing the six bottle minimum as part of “a new pricing strategy throughout its store network and online.”

Majestic is also introducing more customer-friendly changes such as free delivery and free glass hire, and a money back guarantee if customers aren’t satisfied.

It’s a big change to the business and CEO Rowan Gormley is clear that this is about transforming Majestic into a mainstream retailer.

Gormley says in the statement:

Our customers were telling us that they wanted simpler, clearer pricing, and an end to the six bottle minimum. This new structure is part of our wider plan to reposition Majestic Wine to become the go-to destination for the best quality wines at the best prices. There are now no barriers to shopping at Majestic, the pricing structure is very straightforward and I’m sure our customers will see this as a great move.

Earlier this year Majestic bought online wine retailer Naked Wines as part of its growth strategy.

NOW WATCH: How one simple mistake cost ‘Real Housewives’ superstar Bethenny Frankel millions

NOW WATCH: Money & Markets videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.