YouTuber Jake Paul may have crushed rare turtle eggs during beach buggy stunt in Puerto Rico

Jake Paul Logan Paul
Jake Paul’s brother Logan recently moved to the Caribbean island. Johnny Louis / Getty Images
  • YouTuber Jake Paul is being investigated for one of their stunts.
  • He filmed his entourage driving on a beach in Puerto Rico during turtle nesting season.
  • Puerto Rico’s Department of Natural and Environmental Resources responded to the video.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Controversial YouTuber-turned-boxer Jake Paul is being investigated for driving around on a beach in Puerto Rico during turtle nesting season.

In a video posted last week, Paul, 24, and his entourage are seen driving along the sand in what appears to be a small car and a golf cart.

Turtles tend to nest on Puerto Rico’s beaches between February and August, and sections are often cordoned off to ensure they hatch safely.

Puerto Rican people immediately started criticizing Paul for being reckless and driving along a beach where several protected species of turtles lay their eggs, including the highly endangered and world’s largest turtle, leatherbacks. Speeding along the shore in motorized vehicles would damage or destroy any turtle eggs they came into contact with.

Paul’s older brother, Logan, 26, is not visible in the now-deleted video. But he has recently moved to the island and purchased a $10 million mansion.

-Robinson Camacho Rodríguez (@RobiCamacho) May 13, 2021

The secretary of Puerto Rico’s Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, Rafael Machargo, issued a statement after the social media backlash against Paul.

“I have ordered an investigation to determine the circumstances surrounding the use of two motor vehicles on beaches that are presumed to be in Puerto Rico,” he said. “Some media have published today a video of the influencer Jake Paul in a motor vehicle on the beach, an activity that is prohibited, apart from law enforcement agencies.”

He added that Paul’s actions are “prohibited by law to protect the environment and the species that can nest or live on the beaches.”

“Those who violate the law face fines and other penalties, if applicable,” he said.

He then urged the public to report violations of environmental laws by calling 787-724-5700 or 787-230-5550.

-David Begnaud (@DavidBegnaud) May 14, 2021

Insider has reached out to Paul for comment.