Nearly 3 in 5 Australian workers are planning a job change in the next year, LinkedIn says, but Omicron fears have likely rattled confidence

Nearly 3 in 5 Australian workers are planning a job change in the next year, LinkedIn says, but Omicron fears have likely rattled confidence
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  • Almost three in five Australian workers are considering a job change in the coming months, new LinkedIn data suggests.
  • The data, collected before Christmas, shows high levels of workplace confidence.
  • But public-facing sectors recorded the lowest confidence levels, which may have deteriorated further since.
  • Visit Business Insider Australia’s homepage for more stories.

Almost three in five Australian workers are considering a job change in the coming months, new LinkedIn data shows, but the harshest impacts of the COVID-19 Omicron variant are likely to have dampened that workplace optimism.

Fresh data from the employment portal, collected between December 10-20, found 58% of survey respondents were actively considering a job change in 2022.

That data was backed by data suggesting 91% of respondents felt confident in their current role — which LinkedIn believes could encourage workers to seek new positions for higher compensation or greater career potential.

The finance sector topped LinkedIn’s ranking of professions most likely to seek a new role, with 71% of respondents indicating they would consider a fresh start over the coming months.

Such optimism may have been a by-product of a high level of job vacancies leading to the survey period. On Wednesday, the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed there were nearly 400,000 job vacancies in November, up some 169,000 from the dawn of the pandemic.

The LinkedIn data also found some professions have been “positively impacted” since the dawn of the pandemic. Some 32% of respondents in finance said as much, while workers in architecture, engineering and building, media and marketing, and sales responded positively.

While many workers appear to be planning their next career step, the data also revealed which fields faced the worst knocks to their confidence.

Unsurprisingly, respondents in the fields of retail, catering and leisure, arts and culture, healthcare, and education were most likely to report negative impacts.

In the days since the survey period, the Omicron variant has led to massive caseloads and COVID-19 exposures, forcing thousands of essential grocery workers into isolation and forcing the cancellation or postponement of entertainment events.

Workers in the education sector have also bristled against plans to reopen classrooms in the new year, as many students are still ineligible to receive COVID-19 vaccinations.

Thursday’s announcement that teachers and childcare workers are now excluded from prior isolation rules is poised to further disrupt workers hoping to avoid exposure to the virus.