Light, the startup that made a $2,000 camera with 16 lenses, is planning a 9-lens smartphone to be released later this year

Light
  • Camera startup Light plans to introduce its first smartphone later this year, according to the Washington Post.
  • The Post reports that the phone will have between five and nine rear camera lenses, not unlike Light’s L16 camera, which has 16 camera lenses.
  • There’s no word yet on how much the phone will cost, but the L16 camera retails for $US1,950.

Light, a startup known for its 16-lens camera, is bringing its futuristic technology to a new smartphone.

The company plans to unveil its first smartphone later this year,according to the Washington Post’s Geoffrey A. Fowler.

The phone will have somewhere between five and nine camera lenses on the back, will be capable of capturing 64-megapixel images, and will have better low-light performance and “sophisticated depth effects,” the Post reports.

And unlike most current smartphones, Light’s phone will have a circular camera array on the back:

While there’s not much more to go on than that, the L16 camera hints at how Light’s smartphone would work. The L16 works by collecting light information from the 16 different lenses and sensors mounted haphazardly on its back. Then, that information is stitched together by an algorithm to create a high-resolution image that could theoretically rival a photo captured on a DSLR camera.

The idea behind the L16 – and by extension, a smartphone with the same technology – is that you’re able to capture professional photos without having to lug around an expensive digital camera.

Light plans to announce its smartphone later this year, according to the Post. There’s no word yet on how much it will cost, but Light’s L16 camera goes for $US1,950.

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