LG is giving away smart TVs to get people to notice its new G6 smartphone

LG G6 smartphones. (Source: supplied)

LG has launched some critically acclaimed smartphones in recent years but has failed to make a dent in a market dominated by Samsung, Apple and rising star Huawei. The Korean electronics giant has now been forced to pull off an audacious move to get noticed in the Australian handset market.

LG has announced that customers that buy its new G6 smartphone from Telstra through a monthly plan will be given a free 2017 model 43-inch smart television.

“It’s about getting the phones into people’s hands,” said one LG Australia executive on Monday, adding that the television is actually worth more than the phone itself, which will retail at $1008 outright.

The offer applies to customers that sign up for a 24-month Telstra plan that costs $95 per month or more — but anyone taking advantage must be aware of the very short online redemption period of 10 days after purchase.

LG television. (Source: supplied)

The LG G6, dubbed a “back to basics” phone by the manufacturer, features an extra large 5.7-inch screen that’s been squeezed in without making the body larger than its rivals. This was done by narrowing the aspect ratio to 18:9 and incorporating the physical home and back buttons onto the screen to minimise non-screen space on the front face.

The G6 cameras have 125-degree wide angle capability, which could prove useful for group selfies. The G6 is released in Australia with Google Assistant, which is a leg-up against phones like Huawei Mate 9 that use Amazon Alexa, as that voice assistant is not yet available in this country.

Telstra has an exclusive deal with LG to distribute the G6 in Australia, with the free television deal expiring on May 9. The smartphone is available in Australia from today.

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