Stop whatever you're doing and watch this new 'Zelda' trailer

Nintendo’s next big game may be an iPhone exclusive, but that doesn’t mean the Japanese gaming giant is walking away from blockbusters on home consoles. 

2017’s “The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild” is testament to that focus.

The upcoming third-person action-adventure game is scheduled for a 2017 launch — and it’s coming to both Nintendo’s Wii U and its new Switch console. That said, while the new Zelda game was originally planned for a simultaneous launch on both consoles, it sounds like the game won’t be ready in time for the Switch launch in March 2017.

All that aside, a wealth of new footage of the game was published this week by Nintendo.

The image above is from a short new trailer, which teases a more active role for the series’ perennial damsel-in-distress, Princess Zelda. Toward the end of the trailer, Link is seen kneeling behind her as her hand forms a fist:

That’s a new spin for a series that’s notorious for the same characters playing the same roles time and time again. 

Whether or not that’s the case, creative lead Eiji Aonuma has repeatedly stated an intention to take the decades-old franchise in a new direction. To that end, “Breath of the Wild” has a massive open environment — think “Grand Theft Auto,” but set in a fantasy world and much more kid-friendly. 

Some of the game’s massive environment is depicted in the latest trailer:

And look at this view!

The full gameplay trailer is right here:

But if you’re really looking for a tour, Nintendo’s published its own Let’s Play video this week showcasing far more of the game. Check it out right here:

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