A Colorado man died in the Dominican Republic after being removed from a flight for being ill

GoFundMeKhalid Adkins.
  • Khalid Adkins, 46, of Denver died Tuesday after being hospitalized in the Dominican Republic’s capital, Santo Domingo.
  • Adkins’ sister-in-law, Marla Strick, told Fox Denver that Adkins had tried to fly back to the United States but was sweating heavily when he boarded the plane and vomited in the plane’s bathroom.
  • Relatives said they’re still waiting on a cause of death.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

A Colorado man died in the Dominican Republic after being removed from his scheduled flight home because he was too ill to fly, his family said.

Khalid Adkins, 46, of Denver died Tuesday after being hospitalized in Santo Domingo, his sister-in-law, Marla Strick, told Fox Denver.

A State Department representative confirmed to CBS News that a US citizen died in the Dominican Republic on Tuesday.

It’s unclear where Adkins was staying in the country or what airline he was expected to fly home on.

Strick told Fox Denver that Adkins boarded a flight back to the US on Sunday but was sweating heavily and vomited in the plane’s bathroom, prompting his removal from the flight.

Read more: 15 suspicious cases of tourists getting sick, assaulted, and dying in the Dominican Republic in the past year

“They transferred him to Santo Domingo and [said] that his breathing is really bad and that his kidneys were failing,” she told Fox Denver.

His daughter Mia Adkins wrote on her Facebook page that she had been in the Dominican Republic with her father and that he “got super sick” on the day she left the country.

Relatives told the New York Daily News that they’re still waiting on a cause of death.

His family has launched a GoFundMe campaign to pay for the costs of bringing his body back to the United States.

Several US tourists have died while staying at all-inclusive resorts in the Dominican Republic within the past year. Most were said to have died from heart attacks, pulmonary edemas, or other apparent natural causes.

The US State Department told INSIDER that it didn’t publish data regarding natural deaths abroad but that there had not been “an uptick in the number of US citizen deaths reported” in the Dominican Republic compared with previous years.

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