Kavanaugh's accuser says she's ready to publicly testify — and it could kill his nomination

  • President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has had his confirmation proceedings rocked by a decades-old allegation of sexual assault.
  • Now his accuser, a psychology professor named Christine Blasey Ford, has offered to testify publicly.
  • Earlier she had sought anonymity, saying she found it difficult to talk about sexual assault.
  • Some Republican senators seem open to the idea of delaying a vote on Kavanaugh and allowing his accuser to testify, which could sink his nomination.

President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has had his confirmation proceedings rocked by a decades-old allegation of sexual assault.

Now his accuser has stepped into the public eye and offered to publicly testify against him.

Over the weekend a psychology professor at Palo Alto University in California put her name to previously anonymous allegations of sexual misconduct from Kavanaugh at a party when he was in high school.

The woman, Christine Blasey Ford, on Monday offered through her lawyer to testify publicly to the Senate Judiciary Committee and “do whatever it takes to get her story forth,” according to CNN.

Kavanaugh has “categorically” denied the allegation, and a classmate present at the party also dismissed the claim.

But the allegation could be the biggest obstacle yet for Kavanaugh, whose confirmation has met stiff resistance from Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, protesters swarming the hearings, and sometimes-misleading attacks from high-profile Democrats like Hillary Clinton.

Two Republican senators, Bob Corker and Jeff Flake, have already said they’d like to hear more from Ford and possibly delay the confirmation vote.

Ford, in a letter to Sen. Diane Feinstein, the California Democrat to whom she is a constituent, accused Kavanaugh of physically restraining her and attempting to disrobe her with another person whose name was redacted.

Though the letter was written in July, Ford has a documented history of making her claims about Kavanaugh before he emerged as Trump’s latest Supreme Court nominee.

“It is upsetting to discuss sexual assault and its repercussions, yet I felt guilty and compelled as a citizen about the idea of not saying anything,” Ford wrote.

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