A recording of an unreleased John Lennon song is up for auction

A picture of John Lennon and Yoko Ono in January 1970.
John Lennon and Yoko Ono in January 1970. Keystone-France/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
  • The recording features an unreleased Lennon song and an interview with the musician and Yoko Ono.
  • The audiotape was captured by four Danish school kids in January 1970.
  • The recording was made shortly before The Beatles announced their official breakup.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

An old cassette recording of John Lennon performing an unreleased song titled “Radio Peace” is set to be auctioned in the Danish capital Copenhagen Tuesday.

The 33-minute tape – which was recorded by four Danish teenagers in January 1970 just months before The Beatles announced their official break up – also features a recording of an interview with Lennon and his then-wife, Yoko Ono.

Karsten Hoejen, one of the tape’s owners, told the BBC that “Radio Peace” was recorded as a theme song for a radio station.

“The radio station was never opened and the song was never released,” he said. “To our knowledge, the only place where this song exists is on our tape.”

Bruun Rasmussen, the auction house in Copenhagen, said the recording – which is to be sold alongside photographs from the meeting – could fetch between $US32,000 ($AU43,920)-50,000.

At the time of the recording, Lennon and Ono were in Denmark visiting Ono’s 5-year-old daughter Kyoko, who was living in the country with her father, Anthony Cox.

A picture of a cassette of John Lennon.
The cassette and images from the meeting on display. IDA MARIE ODGAARD/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

The famous couple had initially tried to avoid the press, but their presence was soon uncovered and a press conference was organized. However, due to a snowstorm, four 16-year-old school kids who had persuaded their teacher to allow them to travel to the interview for their school’s magazine turned up late. Lennon and Ono agreed to talk to them anyway.”We went into the living room and saw John and Yoko sitting on the sofa, it was fantastic. We sat down with them and were quite close to each other,” Hojen told the AFP news agency. “I was sitting next to Yoko Ono and John Lennon was sitting next to Yoko and we talked. We had a good time.”

Recalling the meeting to the BBC, Hojen said: “John asked me, ‘Where do you come from? A radio station?’ ‘No, from a school magazine,’ I said.”

A picture of a John Lennon cassette tape.
The cassette tape. IDA MARIE ODGAARD/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

The recording also features Lennon playing the guitar and singing his famous protest song “Give Peace a Chance.” At the time of the recording, the Vietnam War was creeping into its deadly 15th year, and months earlier, Lennon and Ono had conducted their famous “Bed-in” peaceful protest against the war.At one point during the taped interview, Lennon is asked, “How do you think that people like me can help you with making peace around the world?”

He responds: “Imitate what we do. Think, what can I do locally?”

The recording also includes passages where Lennon discusses his frustration about the public image of The Beatles as well as the length of his hair and why he had no plans on cutting it.