Job Listings Prove That Microsoft Still Matters

steve ballmer sweaty developersSteve Ballmer’s enthusiasm for developers has paid off.

Microsoft employees sometimes worry that they’re in a technology bubble, as they hear about all the hot new startups building Web systems with non-Microsoft technology like Ruby on Rails, or building iPhone apps in Objective C.But statistics from high-tech job board Dice.com show that Microsoft still matters to a lot of employers.

In fact, developers who want to find work in the tech industry are well-advised to bone up on their Microsoft skills.

As of October 1, Dice had more than 10,000 listings looking for skill with Microsoft’s developer platform .NET (up 29% from last year), more than 8,000 with the Microsoft programming language C# (up 26%), and more than 6,000 (up 24%) referencing the ASP.NET Web development technology.  Anecdotally, Dice’s teams are hearing from a lot of employers that there’s a real crunch for qualified .NET developers.

Microsoft’s collaboration product SharePoint is also hot, with more than 4,000 listings, up 42% from last year. Dice explains that companies in the Midwest are particularly hot for SharePoint developers.

Other technologies may have more listings or faster growth, but few combine both — for instance J2EE/Java tops the list with more than 18,000 job postings but was up only 19% from last year, and Ruby on Rails was up 67% but is found in only 1,800 listings.

The only non-Microsoft technology that is clearly a better bet is JavaScript, with more than 10,000 listings and 53% growth from last year.

The point: this is not what a dying platform company looks like.

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