Jeff Bezos Is Indulging His 11-Year-Old Self And We Love It

Jeff Bezos

Photo: Jeff Bezos from Steve Jurvetson via Flickr

Jeff Bezos once was a very precocious child who loved science and reading, particularly science fiction. Jeff Bezos is now a business executive who just spent $775 million on a robot company.If you had asked an 11-year-old Jeff Bezos to let his imagination run wild and think of the stuff that he would most dream to have as an adult, he might have said:

  • The world’s biggest bookstore! Maybe even a bookstore that can beam any book directly to your hand in an instant (and movies and music, too!).
  • A giant sky computer that can imitate human intelligence. 
  • A spaceship.
  • …And maybe even a robot army. 

Of course any adult would have smiled slightly condescendingly, patted him on the head and helpfully explained that these things aren’t possible. 

So thank you, Jeff Bezos, for realising your dreams and showing the impossible is, indeed, possible. As both Amazon customers and tech industry observers, we’re thrilled to be along for the ride.

(There is, of course, a serious point buried in all this, which is the scale of Bezos’ ambition. In 2003, no one knew what cloud computing was and those who did would have scoffed at the notion that a bookseller might be the market leader. With his purchase of Kiva Systems, Amazon is doubling down on logistics and infrastructure in a long-term bid to become the Walmart of the 21st century. Jeff Bezos gets in touch with his inner child by making shareholders richer and customers happier. That’s pretty amazing.)

Now, read more:

Bezos’ childhood also inspired this amazing commencement speech →

The life and awesomeness of Jeff Bezos →

Why Jeff Bezos wins →

What Amazon will be like in 2030 →

This is what it’s like to work with Jeff Bezos →

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.