JAMIE DIMON: I will not run another major company

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon says he’s not sure what he would do after he leaves the bank, but it won’t be running another big corporation.

In an interview with Bloomberg’s Megan Murphy, Dimon, who was reportedly considered for Treasury secretary, said he did not think he was suited for the position. But he did not rule out a role in government.

“I would never not take a call from the president of the United States of America and would listen to what he has to say and consider what he has to say,” Dimon said.

“When I leave here, I’ll probably teach a little bit,” Dimon added.

“I may write a book. I have been through a lot. I’m lazy, so I’ll probably go to New York City and maybe join or start an entrepreneurs of colour fund like we have here in Detroit. It’s going to be a gas. I’m going to do a lot of stuff. But I will not run another major big company.”

Dimon said Trump filled his cabinet with “very qualified people who are patriots.”

“They’re going to want to help the country,” he said. “They’re not going to try to help their former company.”

Some of Trump’s picks, including two from Goldman Sachs, raised some eyebrows since the president-elect had criticised his opponents’ ties to the bank while campaigning.

Dimon supported President Barack Obama in 2008 and during the aftermath of the financial crisis. But as post-financial-crisis Dodd-Frank regulation started to impact the American financial system, however, he became much more critical.

Dimon said the public’s negative perception of large banks, driven in part by the bailouts they received after the financial crisis, is not going away “for a long time.”

Head over to Bloomberg for the full interview »

NOW WATCH: Watch Yellen explain why the Federal Reserve decides to raise rates

NOW WATCH: Money & Markets videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.