Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner were repeatedly rejected when they tried to fly on Air Force planes, so they found a workaround

  • The White House senior advisers Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, the president’s daughter and son-in-law, sought to assert some authority over flights funded by the State Department, according to a new book previewed by The New York Times.
  • In the book “Kushner Inc.,” the journalist Vicky Ward reportedly writes that Ivanka Trump frequently asked to travel on Air Force planes even when it was not always necessary.
  • Rex Tillerson rejected many of her requests while he was secretary of state, the book said, prompting Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner to invite cabinet-level officials along to justify such trips, The Times reported on Monday night.

The White House senior advisers Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s daughter and son-in-law, have sought to assert some authority over flights funded by the State Department.

That’s according to a new book by the journalist Vicky Ward that was previewed by The New York Times.

The Times cited Ward as saying she interviewed more than 200 people for the book, “Kushner Inc: Greed. Ambition. Corruption. The Extraordinary Story of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump.”

Like many other White House tell-alls that have been published during Trump’s first term, it is said to paint an unflattering picture of the Trump administration as chaotic, with discord among its senior staff.

Read more: New book on Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump paints a gloomy portrait of their lives as the children of billionaires

According to The Times, “Kushner Inc.,” scheduled for release March 19, describes Ivanka Trump as having frequently asked to travel on Air Force planes when doing so was not always necessary. While still secretary of state, Rex Tillerson reportedly rejected her requests.

Steve MnuchinMark Wilson/Getty ImagesTreasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin.

Ivanka Trump found a work-around by inviting Cabinet-level officials to trips, The Times reported.

Those officials often included Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, The Times said, who himself was embroiled in scandal for reportedly wanting to use a $US25,000-an-hour Air Force jet to travel to Europe for his honeymoon.

Seating arrangements on flights have been problematic for White House officials throughout Trump’s presidency. In November, the first lady, Melania Trump, was reportedly in a spat with the deputy national-security adviser, Mira Ricardel, over travel arrangements during the first lady’s maiden overseas trip to Africa.

In a dramatic statement, Melania Trump’s spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham mentioned Ricardel and said “it is the position of the Office of the First Lady that she no longer deserves the honour of serving in this White House.”

Ricardel later left the White House to “transition to a new role within the administration,” according to the White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

In a statement to The Times, a spokesman for Abbe Lowell, Kushner’s attorney, flatly rejected the claims made in the book.

“Every point that Ms. Ward mentioned in what she called her ‘fact checking’ stage was entirely false,” the spokesman Peter Mirijanian said. “It seems she has written a book of fiction rather than any serious attempt to get the facts. Correcting everything wrong would take too long and be pointless.”

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