Vote Of Confidence For Berlusconi? Tell That To Thousands Of Rioters Who Are Smashing Up Rome

Thousands of protesters took to the streets of Rome after Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament today.

The demonstrators clashed with police in a violent riot setting vehicles ablaze and trashing storefronts.

Demonstrators, background, clash with police in Rome's Piazza del Popolo Square on Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. As lawmakers cast their votes, a violent core of anti-Berlusconi protesters outside clashed with police, smashing shop windows, setting cars on fire and hurling firecrackers, eggs and paint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Thousands of demonstrators smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)

A police officer fires tear gas during clashes in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of demonstrators marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)

A police officer subdues a demonstrator in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of demonstrators marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A demonstrator is subdued by Police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Thousands of demonstrators smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of students, some of them downing beers as they marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

A protester is dragged away by police during clashes in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. As lawmakers cast their votes, a violent core of anti-Berlusconi protesters outside clashed with police, smashing shop windows, setting cars on fire and hurling firecrackers, eggs and paint (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Demonstrators, background, clash with police in Rome's Piazza del Popolo Square on Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. As lawmakers cast their votes, a violent core of anti-Berlusconi protesters outside clashed with police, smashing shop windows, setting cars on fire and hurling firecrackers, eggs and paint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of demonstrators marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)

Smoke billows from burning police vehicles following clashes in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of students, some of them downing beers as they marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of students, some of them downing beers as they marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Police officers take position during clashes in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of demonstrators marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of demonstrators marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Outside parliament, thousands of students, some of them downing beers as they marched, smashed shop windows, destroyed bank ATMs and set at least three vehicles on fire. At one point they even entered a bank, prompting staffers to try to barricade themselves inside. Police fired tear gas as the protesters neared Berlusconi's residence. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. But he was left with a razor-thin majority that will make it hard for him to govern effectively. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Demonstrators wave a flag as they march past the ancient Colosseum in downtown Rome, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Premier Silvio Berlusconi survived a confidence vote in Italy's Senate on Tuesday, but another riskier vote followed in the lower house, where a few swing lawmakers will determine his political fate. The votes were being held in a tense climate, with Rome's historic centre, where parliament buildings and the premier's office are located, under a heavy police presence. Scores of anti-Berlusconi demonstrations were under way in cities across the country to coincide with the votes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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