Italy finally agreed on a government, ending months of political deadlock

Franco Origlia/Getty ImagesGiuseppe Conte delivers a declaration after a meeting with Italian President Sergio Mattarella.
  • A government coalition has finally been reached in Italy, ending a months-long stalemate that seemed to be headed towards a snap election.
  • President Sergio Mattarella on Thursday approved a cabinet list presented by Giuseppe Conte.
  • Conte has been appointed prime minister and, along with his cabinet, will be sworn in on Friday.
  • Conte initially dropped his bid to secure cabinet after President Mattarella’s blocked Conte’s initial choice for economy minister, which cast doubt on the ability of the coalition to form a government.

A government coalition has finally been reached in Italy, ending a months-long stalemate that seemed to be headed towards a snap election.

Prime Minister-designate Giuseppe Conte initially dropped his bid to lead a coalition after President Sergio Mattarella blocked Conte’s initial choice for economy minister because of his euroskeptic views, which cast doubt on the ability of parties to form a government.

But on Thursday Conte presented a second cabinet list to Mattarella, which proposed economics professor Giovanni Tria who doesn’t advocate leaving the euro, though is critical of the EU. The president approved the list Thursday and announced Conte would be the country’s new prime minister.

Conte, along with the rest of his cabinet, will be sworn in Friday.

Italy has struggled to form a government since its March 4 elections. The anti-establishment Five Star Movement, together with far-right League won approximately 50% of the popular vote, but failed to secure the majority needed to win. As coalition attempts remained in deadlock, calls were made to appoint a technocratic interim government until fresh elections could be held early next year.

Shortly after the coalition announcement was made, League leader Matteo Salvini criticised an EU leader for reportedly racist comments made about Italy’s impoverished southern region,Reuters reported. Salvini called the comments “shameful and racist,” adding: “The new government will make sure that the rights and the dignity of 60 million Italians will be respected.”

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