This $US12 Plastic Brick Shaped Like An IPhone Wants To Cure Your Smartphone Addiction

We live in an age of potato salad Kickstarters, one-word messaging apps like Yo, and now, a plastic brick that you can pretend is your iPhone.

If you have $US12, are addicted to your smartphone, and are too insecure to be seen without it, you may be interested in the NoPhone, a recent Kickstarter project that’s already raised over $US2,500.

But if you’re looking for innovation, look elsewhere, because the NoPhone is literally a plastic brick designed mimic the shape of an iPhone 5, claiming to be a “technology-free alternative to constant hand-to-phone contact.”

The Kickstarter page is complete with some tongue-in-cheek testimonials features like “battery free,” “shatterproof,” and “waterproof,” there’s even accompanying testimonials. “With the NoPhone, my eye contact skills have improved 73%” says David H., while Whitney R. claims that “Because of the NoPhone, I haven’t drunk texted my ex boyfriend in one whole week.”

There’s even the blunt and honest “Not a real phone” testimonial.

While the Kickstarter campaign uses smartphone addiction as its angle of supposed genuine intent, it’s hard to shake the feeling that this was all a joke thrown together as an ironic experiment.

After all, it’s tough to think someone looking to take a break from their phone would find clutching a plastic replica any more soothing than just powering off their device.

Some of the offers, like the $US5,000 pledge level, sound like glorified excuses for its founders to travel for free, hidden under the guise of a personal delivery from a NoPhone founder “anywhere in the world.”

The NoPhone still has a ways to go, as it needs to raise $US30,000 by Oct. 11 in order for the project to move forward.

If you’re looking for a new ironic purchase, you can pick up a NoPhone for yourself right here.

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