The Biggest iPhone Is Already Sold Out, But Plenty Of The Smaller Phones Are Still Available

Iphone 6Steve Kovach/Business InsiderThe iPhone 6 Plus, left, with the iPhone 6, middle, and the iPhone 6.

Don’t count on getting your hands on an iPhone 6 Plus anytime too soon. Starting Friday at 12 a.m. PT, Apple started rolling out preorders for its iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, but it looks like the first batch of the larger 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus is already sold out.

At the time of this writing (9:00 a.m. ET), the iPhone 6 Plus was delayed by three to four weeks for all colours, carriers, and storage capacities. The 4.7-inch iPhone 6 is set to ship within seven to 10 business days, which just about lines up with the iPhone’s official in-store launch scheduled for Sept. 19.

The wait is just as bad, and in some cases even worse, if you try to preorder the iPhone 6 Plus from a carrier website. Verizon estimates that the 16GB and 64GB iPhone 6 Plus will ship by Oct. 14, while the 128GB version will be delivered around Oct. 21. AT&T estimates that it will take between 35-42 days to ship the iPhone 6 Plus in all storage capacities.

According to Verizon’s website, the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 will ship by Sept. 19, while AT&T estimates that it will take a week or two to ship the smaller-sized iPhone model to its customers. Sprint’s online store is currently down, and T-Mobile’s website simply says the iPhone 6 Plus will ship “soon.”

The delay in iPhone 6 Plus orders doesn’t come as too much of a surprise. Before Apple unveiled its new smartphones, reports suggested Apple’s first phablet would be delayed due to production issues.

We’ll update this article accordingly if the situation changes.

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