Intel Is Apparently The Latest Tech Company To Think It Can Replace Cable TV

Intel CEO Paul Otellini

Photo: AP

Intel has been talking to media companies about delivering pay-TV programming, and has even begun requesting rate cards to see how much it would cost to licence shows.That’s according to the Wall Street Journal, which says the service would use Intel-made set-top boxes, an Intel interface, and might even carry the Intel brand. The service could come out late this year.

This sounds doomed from the get-go.

Every other effort by tech companies to replace TV has failed. Google TV, Apple TV, Boxee — none of them have dented the growth of pay-TV services at all. Cable TV providers have seen some defections, but mostly to phone companies providing TV over fibre networks, like Verizon and AT&T.

It’s really hard to see Intel succeeding where other tech companies have failed. It doesn’t sell to consumers. It has no experience in the media business.

It doesn’t even have a great track record providing hardware to the TV business, either. Intel had a partnership with Google for the first generation of Google TV, but Google reportedly switched to ARM-based technology and Intel shut down the group making the processors for the box.

See also: The History Of Interactive TV Failures Leading Up To Steve Jobs’ Final “One More Thing”

 

 

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