Instagram joins parade of major apps to abandon Apple Watch

Apple
  • Instagram is bailing on Apple Watch.
  • Slack, eBay, Amazon, Google Maps, and Whole Foods have already abandoned the device.
  • Companies are figuring out that they do not all need to be on a device with such a limited set of functions.

The Instagram app will disappear from Apple Watch with the next update to the watch’s operating system. A number of major app developers have stopped supporting the existence of their apps on the smart watch. Slack, Whole Foods, eBay, Amazon, Google Maps, and smart thermostat maker ecobee have all abandoned Apple Watch,according to 9to5Mac.

Recently, Apple has required app developers to make their apps “native” to the watch, rather than allowing them to function on the watch via its pairing tether to the iPhone. Native development requires extra work from app companies.

That, coupled with the watch’s small screen which isn’t great for photos, probably sealed the deal for Instagram. As Apple Insider’s Roger Fingas put it, “Instagram’s presence on the Watch has always been controversial. The wearable doesn’t have any cameras, and its small screen makes it impossible to see photos in much detail.”

The Facebook-owned company confirmed the move to iPhoneAddict:

“The Instagram app for Apple Watch will no longer be available as a stand-alone experience once users upgrade to Instagram version 39 on iOS, released on April 2, 2018. We are committed to providing users with the best experience with their Apple products and we will continue to explore ways to achieve this on all platforms. Users with an Apple Watch will continue to enjoy a great Instagram experience through various rich and varied notifications.”

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