The 10 Industries That Lost The Most Jobs In 2010

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Photo: By taberandrew on flickr

While markets and profits rebounded this year, hiring did not.Since last November, the BLS has recorded a mediocre 842K increase to nonfarm payrolls, with a 1,088K increase to the private sector.

State and local governments suffered the most as property tax revenue cratered. Manufacturing job loss continued in most sectors.

#10 Nondurable goods

Nov. 2009: 4,505,000

Nov. 2010: 4,472,000

Change: --33,000

Nondurable goods includes everything from food manufacturing to apparel and chemicals to paper products. Plastic and rubber products alone lost 18,900 jobs. This continues an ongoing migration of factory jobs out of America.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#9 Construction of buildings

Nov. 2009: 1,295,900

Nov. 2010: 1,257,000

Change: --38,900

It should come as no surprise that significantly more jobs were lost in residential construction than in nonresidential construction -- 31,300 versus 7,600.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#8 State government (excluding education)

Nov. 2009: 2,793,600

Nov. 2010: 2,754,600

Change: --39,000

This year's increasing state deficits have resulted in more government hiring freezes and layoffs.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#7 Real estate and rental and leasing

Nov. 2009: 1,966,800

Nov. 2010: 1,927,500

Change: --39,300

Per the ongoing housing crash, this number won't surprise anyone.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#6 Telecommunications

Nov. 2009: 961,400

Nov. 2010: 920,600

Change: --40,800

Of all the sectors in the information industry, telecommunications was hit the hardest.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#5 US Postal Service

Nov. 2009: 682,800

Nov. 2010: 641,700

Change: --41,100

With the continued development of digital communication technologies like smart phones, Skype and Google docs, who still sends mail? The loss of jobs in the U.S. Postal Service reflects a long-term and continuing secular change.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#4 Accounting and bookkeeping services

Nov. 2009: 918,400

Nov. 2010: 876,200

Change: --42,200

Though professional and technical services as an industry has only lost 3,900 jobs, the accounting and bookkeeping subsector lost a whopping 42,200 jobs. Blame it on efficiency.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#3 Specialty trade contractors

Nov. 2009: 3,627,600

Nov. 2010: 3,525,500

Change: --102,100

Special ity trade contractors are hired for specific activities like concrete pouring, painting, electrical work, etc. With job losses in construction, it's natural this industry would be hit hard as well.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#2 Local government (excluding education)

Nov. 2009: 6,448,000

Nov. 2010: 6,330,500

Change: --117,500

Local government revenue, often driven by property tax, has faced an unprecedented revenue collapse. Cities turned to hiring freezes at best, layoffs at worst.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

#1 Local government education

Nov. 2009: 8,054,100

Nov. 2010: 7,910,400

Change: --143,700

School systems, also dependent on property taxes, are near broke around the country. Job loss has been severe.

Source: Seasonally-adjusted nonfarm payrolls from the U.S. Bureau of labour Statistics

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