10 wounded in suicide attack at Indonesian police headquarters, a day after local churches were attacked in three suicide bombings

Screenshot/TwitterCCTV footage shows the moment a motorcycle exploded at a police checkpoint in Surabya, Indonesia on Monday, May 14 2018.
  • 10 were wounded in a suicide attack commited at a police headquarters in Surabaya, Indonesia.
  • The attack was carried out by a family of five, who rode in on motorbikes.
  • The attack followed three suicide bombings targeting churches in Surabaya on Sunday that killed at least 13 and injured many more.
  • The family of six who launched Sunday’s suicide attacks reportedly tried to join Islamic State in Syria and were sent back to Indonesia.
  • The family was tied to Jamaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD), an ISIS-inspired umbrella organisation on the US State Department terror watchlist.

A suicide bombing at the police headquarters in Surabaya, Indonesia, on Monday injured several.

Spokesperson for the East Java Police Commissioner Frans Barung Mangera said the explosion occurred at 8:50 a.m. local time at a checkpoint outside of the building. CCTV footage shows a motorbike approaching the checkpoint and an explosion occurs moments later.

Police said the attack was carried out by a family of five who rode in on two motorbikes. Four of the family members died in the bombing, while an eight-year-old girl survived.

“Clearly it’s a suicide bombing,” Mangera said.

Ten people, including four police officers, were injured in the attack.

Mangera added that Monday’s attack may be related to the string of attacks which occurred on Sunday, as similar explosive devices were used.

Surabaya is Indonesia’s second largest city.

Suicide attacks targeted churches on Sunday

Monday’s attack follows three suicide attacks targeting churches in Surabaya on Sunday that killed at least 13 and injured many others.

The family of six who conducted the suicide attacks reportedly tried to join Islamic State in Syria and were sent back to Indonesia.

Indonesia’s police chief, Tito Karnavian, said at a news conference that the family had recently returned from Syria. “Five hundred people were deported from Syria; among them is this family,” he said.

According to The Australian, Karnavian said the family had attempted to join ISIS but were arrested by Turkish authorities and were sent back to Indonesia. The family was tied to Jamaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD), an ISIS-inspired umbrella organisation on the US State Department terror watch list.

Karnavian identified the father as Dita Futrianto, who was said to be the head of the Surabaya cell of JAD.

The explosions were carefully coordinated and were minutes apart.

Karnavian said the first bomb occurred in the parking lot of Sura¬≠baya’s Santa Maria Church, and is believed to have been detonated by the family’s two eldest sons, aged 16 and 18, who approached the church on motorcycles rigged with explosives.

The second blast occured shortly after and is believed to have been detonated by their mother, Puji, and her two young daughters, aged 9 and 12. Karnavian said Dita dropped the three off at Diponegoro Indonesian Christian Church after outfitting them with explosives.

The final blast occured at Surabaya Center Pentecostal Church, after the father crashed into the church and detonated a bomb said to have been inside his car.

Two failed attacks were reported at two more churches, due to bombs failing to detonate, the Jakarta Post reported.

The police later discovered three bombs at the family’s home, the New York Times reported, citing officials in Surabaya.

Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attacks.

President Joko Widodo said the attacks were “a crime against humanity and has nothing to do with religion,” and ordered police to break up militant networks.

In a statement, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull condemned the “cowardly terrorist attacks” and said the Australian government “stands in solidarity with the government of Indonesia.”

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