IKEA partnered with a tiny home maker to unveil its own 'Tiny Home Project' — see inside the $63,350 Vista Boho XL

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s exterior.
  • Tiny home maker Escape Homes partnered with IKEA to create a tiny home on wheels for the furniture giant’s sustainability-focused Tiny Home Project.
  • The tiny home sits inside of Escape Homes’ 187-square foot Vista Boho XL, which has a bedroom, living room, kitchen, and bathroom.
  • The interior is primarily equipped with IKEA furniture, and the home is now being offered by Escape Homes for $US63,350.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tiny home maker Escape Homes partnered with IKEA to create the furniture giant’s Tiny Home Project.

According to IKEA’s explanation of the project as posted on Curbed, the little home on wheels was inspired by a push towards “sustainability, inclusivity, and innovation.”

“IKEA’s ‘People and Planet Positive’ sustainability strategy is our roadmap,” the furniture company’s sustainability manager Jennifer Keesson said in a video explaining the project. “We want to meet the needs of generations today without compromising the need of generations in the future.”

The resulting collaboration between IKEA and Escape Homes consists of a 187-square foot unit based on Escape Homes’ Vista Boho XL, a $US47,550 tiny home with a bedroom, living room, kitchen, and bathroom. The IKEA version, which has the same layout as the original, is now being offered for $US63,350.

Keep scrolling to see inside:


“[Tiny living] is a very hot trend that has become hotter as people move away from cities, crowded apartments, and condos due to COVID-19 and into safe spaces of their own,” Escape’s founder Dan Dobrowolski told Business Insider in the email interview.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s exterior.

“IKEA’s decor does lend well to tiny living, and their purpose for conceptualizing ‘The IKEA Tiny Home Project’ was to inspire consumers to bring sustainability into their own lives,” Dobrowolski continued.


According to Dobrowolski, Escape Homes was approached for the project about 11 months ago before the coronavirus pandemic hit the US.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s bathroom.

Escape Homes spent about 60 days sorting through all of the items IKEA wanted to include in the tiny home, and in total, the project took about four months to complete. This includes the time it took to build the base Vista Boho XL model.

IKEA also partnered with Vox for the project, but Escape did not work with Vox directly, according to Dobrowolski.


Most of the cabinets and furniture in the tiny home are from IKEA, but the rest of the unit remains true to the classic Vista Boho XL.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s kitchen and bedroom.

IKEA has played a quiet role in the tiny home movement, in part by offering tiny living friendly furniture.

In the past, #VanLifers have also used IKEA furniture in their camper vans to make van conversions more convenient and affordable.


IKEA’s furniture can be seen throughout the home. This includes the kitchen, which has IKEA’s Kungsbacka series made of recycled wood and bottles, and the living room, which has the foldable and storage-equipped Norden dining and work table.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s kitchen.

Like the Norden table, many furniture pieces throughout the tiny home are multipurpose. This includes the bed, which has under-bed storage.


The small space also has plenty of storage units, including the aforementioned under-bed storage, hanging storage racks, kitchen cabinet, and shelves near the ceiling.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s interior.

The tiny home can sleep up to two people, but the original non-IKEA iteration can fit more with a couch-bed.


The exterior of IKEA’s Tiny Home Project includes Escape’s trademark Japanese-inspired burnt wood siding, which is known as “Shou Sugi Ban.”

Escape HomesThe Escape Vista Boho XL.

This wood theme extends to the interior, which is lined with Escape’s “signature sustainably grown pine.”


The interior walls are painted white to make the space feel larger, according to IKEA and Vox’s video explainer about the Tiny Home Project.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s desk and sofa.

The white walls complement the neutral tones of the furniture.

Source: Curbed


Many aspects of the interior are also eco friendly to stay true to IKEA’s sustainability-focused goals for the tiny home.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s roof.

This includes the use of LED lights, roof-mounted solar panels, and thermopane windows.

The kitchen and bathroom faucets also use less water than traditional faucets, according to its maker.


The home on wheels can be attached to a vehicle, like a pickup truck, to be towed around to any destination.

Josiah and Steph PhotographyThe IKEA Tiny Home Project’s exterior.

It can then stay off-grid using the solar panels and water heater.

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