Hundreds of stolen photos of Australian women have ended up on a US 'revenge porn' website

Police from South Australia’s electronic crime division are investigating how intimate photos of women believed to be living in the state have ended up on a US-based “revenge porn” website.

It’s not known how the photos were accessed, but they are believed to have been posted without permission and police are urging anyone affected to report it via the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN).

Adelaide’s The Advertiser reports that the 21-year-old daughter of retired AFL player Graham Cornes is among an estimated 400 women whose stolen images ended up on the site. Some pictures are believed to be of underage girls.

Under 2013 changes to South Australian law, it’s an offence for adults to indecently film or distribute images of people aged over 18, and the state’s child pornography laws also make it a crime for anyone to transmit or possess naked pictures of a person aged under 17.

Anyone found guilty of making and sharing child pornography faces up to 10 years in jail and may end up on the sex offender registry. Distributing indecent images of an adult without the permission of the person involved attracts up to two years in jail under South Australian law.

The images emerged in a message board discussion featuring “100+ different pics of SA chicks” and some victims discovered their images had been taken via social media.

The Advertiser says those behind the website images have been taunting authorities and the victims who demand the photos, which are being offered for downloading, be removed from the site, telling them “you cannot do anything to stop us”. The site’s moderator reportedly refused to help because its US base makes it exempt from Australian law.

SA Police have asked Australian authorities to look at whether they can block local access to the site. The Australian Communication and Media Authority (ACMA) has the power to block access to sites with illegal material via local ISPs.

The police warned of the long-term psychological effects of images and texts sent electronically.

“It is timely to stress that uploading of images and texts are done in an instant and often without thinking about the long term effects. Unfortunately, these images and texts remain in the electronic mediums forever,” a police spokesperson said.

While the US introduced “revenge porn” laws earlier this year and some Australian states have also tackled the issue, there is no national laws on the issue.

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