Here's what Trump's tax plan means for people working in finance who make between $40,000 and $139,000 a year

Scott Olson / Getty ImagesHere’s what people working in finance should look out for.

• Senate and House Republicans must agree on a final version of their widely criticised tax plans before it can move forward.

• Career site Zippia broke down how the Senate tax plan could affect take-home pay in 2018 for people in various occupations.

• Business Insider looked into how the plan could affect people working in finance.

People aren’t happy about the tax plans put forward by congressional Republicans.

According to a recent CBS poll, only 35% of Americans approve of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. While the plan may increase take-home pay for most people, Business Insider’s Lauren Lyons Cole reported, the increase in pocket money will be minimal for most people.

Career site Zippia provided Business Insider with data breaking down how different occupations fare under the Senate’s tax plan.

Business Insider specifically looked at how financial professionals fared under the new tax plan. The estimated federal tax savings below are for a single, childless taxpayer who claims the standard deduction.

Here’s a look at how people working in finance, from accounting clerks to financial managers, could see their taxes change next year if the Senate’s tax plan becomes law:


Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks

Naresuan261/Shutterstock

Average salary: $US40,220

Current tax: $US4,007

Tax under the Senate plan: $US3,196

Per cent tax cut: 20.2%


Accountants and auditors

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Average salary: $US76,730

Current tax: $US12,321

Tax under the Senate plan: $US10,180

Per cent tax cut: 17.4%


Budget analysts

Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Average salary: $US77,170

Current tax: $US12,431

Tax under the Senate plan: $US10,277

Per cent tax cut: 17.3%


Credit analysts

Justin Sullivan / Staff / Getty Images

Average salary: $US81,160

Current tax: $US13,429

Tax under the Senate plan: $US11,155

Per cent tax cut: 16.9%


Operations research analysts

Average salary: $US84,340

Current tax: $US14,224

Tax under the Senate plan: $US11,901

Per cent tax cut: 16.3%


Financial examiners

Average salary: $US88,940

Current tax: $US15,374

Tax under the Senate plan: $US13,005

Per cent tax cut: 15.4%


Management analysts

Average salary: $US91,910

Current tax: $US16,116

Tax under the Senate plan: $US13,718

Per cent tax cut: 14.9%


Financial analysts

Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

Average salary: $US97,640

Current tax: $US17,549

Tax under the Senate plan: $US15,093

Per cent tax cut: 14.0%


Securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

Average salary: $US102,260

Current tax: $US18,704

Tax under the Senate plan: $US16,202

Per cent tax cut: 13.4%


Personal financial advisors

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Average salary: $US123,100

Current tax: $US24,538

Tax under the Senate plan: $US21,204

Per cent tax cut: 13.6%


Financial managers

Average salary: $US139,720

Current tax: $US29,191

Tax under the Senate plan: $US25,192

Per cent tax cut: 13.7%

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