Hailing A Cab From This iPhone App Is Convenient, But It Could Cost You 3x A Normal Ride

taxi driver

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Uber, the service that lets you order a cab from your iPhone, is now available in New York City.The service started out in the San Francisco and finally arrived in New York last week.

Uber touts it’s convenience, but reviews in the App Store are full of complaints about the steep cost.

If you need to get some place quick, or it’s pouring rain, or there isn’t a cab in sight, Uber is a great option.

Using a text message or the iPhone or Android app, it’s easy to place an order for a car to come pick you up without even setting foot out of your home.

After you get the app, click the link below to see how Uber works.

Download the Uber app and launch it to register for the service

Type in your personal information, as well as a credit card (which Uber requires in order to sign up).

Once you enter in your information, you are brought to a map that shows the location of every Uber car near you. Drag the map to pick another pick up location (the default is your current location). Once you place your order, watch the map as the car approaches your location.

Once you set up Uber, you don't even need the app to use it. If you do not have a smartphone, you can set up an account at Uber.com and use texting to order a driver. One nice feature of Uber is that they'll text you the ETA for your driver, and they'll text you again once he or she arrives.

Once the car arrives, hop in and tell the driver your destination. Everything will be charged to the credit card Uber has on file.

It's a great concept, but there are tons of complaints about pricing.

Now that you've learned how to use Uber to order a personal driver....

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