Here's How To Pick Your Future neighbours

Part of the joy of owning your own home is having great neighbours: someone to put your garbage out or shut your garage door when you forget, a neighbour that has a ladder that’s just the right height you need to borrow once a year, or simply someone to share a beer with on a warm summer night.

But how do you stack the odds in your favour to get that perfect neighbour?  Here are some tips:

  • Know when a home close by is up for sale: Sometimes even friendly neighbours are shy about telling you they are moving.  Keep an eye on real estate listings on Zillow and signs in yards, as once a home is for sale, it’s time to pounce into action.
  • Get friendly with the listing agent: Once a real estate agent meets the potential neighbours for a listing, it sometimes gives them a better feel for who might be a good candidate for the home and how to market it.  We’ve all seen phrases like “great neighbourhood for kids” or “tight-knit area.”  Help the agent frame just what makes your block special.
  • Promote the home to your circle of friends: In today’s world of social media, there’s no better way to help pick your neighbours than to spread the news of the opportunity to those you know.  Grab the listing from Zillow and send it on to your friends through email, Facebook and Twitter.
  • Meet Your Potential New Best Friend: As potential owners tour a home, you certainly don’t want to get in the way of their big decision, but if you happen to cross paths, giving a quick “hi” often leads to a friendly conversation and lots of questions from perspective buyers.  You can provide valuable local info and perhaps even meet a future neighbour in the process.

This post originally appeared at Zillow.

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